Moonlighting with Lua – the powerful tool for music notation you never hear of.

I suppose a good place to start is with the question “What exactly is Lua?”

Lua is a lightweight computer programming language (the complete Lua distribution could fit on a floppy disk) designed primarily for use within other applications (think plugins) to increase functionality and productivity of the host software program.

Video games are a good example. In recent years, Lua has risen to become a lingua franca for scripting in video games as diverse as World of Warcraft and Angry Birds. For programmers with an interest in this area, this means that your Lua programming skills are transferable from company to company.

Lua’s construct of simple, flexible meta-features can be extended as needed, rather than supplying a feature-set specific to one software program. This makes Lua an ideal and powerful tool for music notation software.

History & Trivia: Lua was created in 1993 by members of the Computer Graphics Technology Group (Tecgraf) at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), in Brazil. In 2011, Lua was honored with Game Developer Magazine’s Front Line Award in the programming tool category.

‘Lua’ is the Portuguese word for ‘moon’. In Roman mythology, ‘Lua’ was the Goddess to whom soldiers sacrificed captured weapons. 

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Using the Select Graphic feature of Sibelius for correspondence & desktop publishing

Q: Occasionally when I write to someone I want to include a few music symbols, say, a metronome indication or generic notes and rests to illustrate a rhythm; it’s frustrating not to be able to copy and paste directly from Sibelius. What font do you recommend for typing independent musical symbols?

A: For this task, Sibelius has a cool feature which allows you to paste musical examples as a graphic into other programs which is perfect for this purpose.

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How to Display Projects Using a Handwritten Style in Dorico Pro | Getting Started with Dorico 2

🎬  This article is a transcription of one of the excellent tutorial videos posted to the official Dorico YouTube channel.

Presented here in written form with the kind permission of its creator, Anthony Hughes, this tutorial is titled “How to Display your projects using a handwritten Style in Dorico Pro 2″…


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Create Lead / Top Line Chord Notation for Rock, Jazz & Pop Charts in Finale

Lead Line Chord Notation, also referred to as Topline Notation is a shorthand notation convention that is sometimes used for rock, jazz and pop guitar or keyboard charts.

Lead Line / Topline notation is a good way to get the chord voicings you are looking for as a composer or arranger, particularly if you don’t actually play guitar (or piano); it allows you to specify melodic motion of the chords without having to supply details of voicings you may or may not know are practical (or possible) on that instrument.

To create this type of notation, visually, the stems are extended past the noteheads to show that the chords are voiced below (or above) the written lead notes. Here is an example:

Let’s take a look at a couple of different ways to create this type of notation in Finale.

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