Displaying Different Octaves In Score and Parts in Finale Part 1

Q: “I’m working on a Violin Concerto in Finale 2011. The violinist who is playing the concerto prefers to have all the high passages written out in pitch (rather than using ottava notation).  However, I would like to use ottava notation In the score. How to I show the notes at pitch in the part, and at 8vb with the ottava lines in the score?”

A: While this is a little different than creating a part for an octave transposing instrument, we’ll use similar techniques to create it. In FInale 2012 and earlier, we’ll create and use an octave transposing Staff Style for this, in combination with ottava lines which are visible in the score, and hidden in the part. Here’s how:

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Gaps Before Codas for Score and Parts in Sibelius

“I would like to add a gap between bars for a Coda in my score and parts in Sibelius, but the gap is only showing up in the parts. How can I make the split system show up in the parts as well?”

sib-gap-before-bar

In Sibelius 6, you must manually split the multirest in the same bar as the Split System in order for a Coda (e.g. System split) gap to show up in all the parts.

In Sibelius 7, the Split Multirest is automatically added when you select Split System, so normally, these will show up automatically in the parts this way.

However, note that in either Sibelius 6 or Sibelius 7, you also need to have “Keep gaps before codas (that have split multirests)” checked in the Layout Tab of the Multiple Part Appearance dialog for this to work properly.

In Sibelius 7, go to the Parts tab, Part Appearance and select the Layout tab. Check “Keep gaps before codas (that have split multirests)”

In Sibelius 6, select the Multi Part Appearance button in the Parts Window, and select the Layout tab. Check “Keep gaps before codas (that have split multirests)”

Create a score without key signatures for some instruments in Finale

There is a convention in Classical music to display certain parts chromatically, without a key signature, in a piece where the other instruments show the key signature – technically a mix of tonal and atonal staves, for lack of a better term. Timpani, Horn and even Trumpets are sometimes found notated chromatically this way.

Copeland, Stravinsky and Holst are three well known composers that have followed this convention for some of their works.

If you are using Finale 2014 or later, support for Keyless Scores is now built in; you no longer have to change transposition manually.

But how does one create a score which shows key signatures on some staves but not on others in Finale 2012 and earlier?

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